LK3 Houston

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Legacy Fighting Championship recently released their line up for the following LK3 event, set to take place at the Bayou Music Center in downtown Houston Texas.

Main Card (AXS TV):

135 – Anke Van Gestle (22-3) vs. Valentina Schevchenko (56-1)

205 Quarterfinals – Andres Van Engelen (8-1) vs. Danny Mitchell (4-1)

205 Quarterfinals – Manny Mancha (11-2) vs. Fernando Almeida (9-1)

160 – Richard Abraham (6-2) vs. Daniel Kim (4-2)

140 – Justin Houghton (6-2) vs. Angel Huerta (5-1)

140 – Jordan Wieland (21-3) vs. Samuel Mongonia (16-3)

Prelims:

154 – Adam Edgerton vs. Nethaneel Mongonia

125 – Andrea Lee vs. TBD

170 – RJ Knepp vs. Mike “The Truth” Jackson

135 – Bobby Bradshaw vs. Akira Smith

135 – Alexiz Chavarria vs. Dulani Perry

185 Amateur – Marcus Johnson vs. Jacob Rodriguez

105 Amateur – Emily Scmitt vs. Bi Nguyen

145 Amateur – Oliver Jimenez vs. John Miller

the card should prove to be a very exciting night of talented fighters, all looking to show case their abilities.

you can get further info here http://www.LKfights.com

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Muay Thai Kingdom 4

Week out from LK1

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*wrote this before the LK1 event on Jan16th

 

In a couple of days my brother Samuel Mongonia will be stepping into the ring against an opponent with twice his experience for Legacy FC’s LK1 event Jan 16th. In the weeks leading up to this fight, we’ve had one hurdle after another. It’s been one big battle from day one, but looking back I’m glad we’re at where we’re at. When you get in the ring, the allusion is that it’s just the fighter, but to quote my brother “it’s me in there, but it’s all of us”. What makes a great fighter isn’t solely his/her talent and hard work; it’s the village that builds the fighter. You can’t be a great fighter and a narcissist. I take personal responsibility for each and every person that I put in the ring. It’s a responsibility I don’t take lightly, and it often weighs heavy on my heart because each and every single one of my fighters is my friend and my family. In all honesty, it’s a big scary world out there. You’ve got a lot of promoters that are looking only to use your guys as tomato cans; my family is too precious to me to be someone’s kicking can. One reason I like tournaments, is because it allows you to get fights against high level guys and get attention, while fighting guys on neutral ground. When I book fights for my guys, I try to book good fights. Not easy fights, but fights that they’re prepared for. I pour my whole heart into my family, and those that are worth my time and being called family do likewise… We couldn’t do this without the all the people, from fellow fighter Jennifer Guerrero and coach Uriel Figueroa to the friendships and everyone whom walked with Sam every step of the day, and that includes the hobbyist’s like Brad and the morning crew that get up in the awful time of the morning to run and train in the freezing wet cold that is a Houston winter.

I whole heartedly believe that the key to our success isn’t one person, but all of us… all of Revolution. We must always remember a fast rise, leads to a fast fall. It’s about earning fights… it’s about building a legacy, and there is no substitute for experience. It’s been a long road for us, but all the hard work is worth it. Legacy FC is starting a kick boxing league called LK1 and Muay Thai Kingdom, has continued to be successful hosting good shows. So the future for Houston Kickboxing and Muay Thai looks bright.

 

TheKrastaGroupMuayThaiAddict

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The warriors heart

-The warrior’s heart

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As usual, I love to ponder. This past week has given me some extra time to slow down and think; Time to think about family, sport, spirit and put pen to paper. This year we’ve been very active this year for our team. We just love to fight, doesn’t matter where.

I must admit that we are a society that is very driven and obsessed with victory, and our contempt for losing is unparalleled. Everything is about winning. If you don’t think so, go to a book store and take a quick look at the top sellers. Turn on the TV and watch some reality TV, everything we do is about winning, and I wonder how much of it has more to do with us compensating for our mental and spiritual inadequateness.

Seriously, I often find it interesting and perplexing how a fighter can loses a couple of matches and all the sudden the fans turn on them. “He’s a bum” or “he’s finished, he needs to retire”… I don’t get why we let couch-potatoes judge our careers. As if these guys know the sacrifice that fighters make. After all, how can you hold a scoring system that is judged like a beauty contest seriously against someone?

“I’ve missed more than 9000 shots in my career. I’ve lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I’ve been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I’ve failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed.”
Michael Jordan

And that’s where the lore of boxing comes in, were they have a long history of failures and underdog coming back to win or overcome life obstacles.

Speaking with a friend who just popped in from NYC, after training, we were just chatting a bit and he made the comment that “there’s a lot of heart in this sport”. This really resonated with me, because in Muay Thai… it’s not about the KO; winning is nice (don’t get me wrong, I like to win) but it’s about the fight. It’s about the exchange between two strong wills. It’s about who can dig deeper. It’s about two gods locked in immortal combat. It’s when we get to see the human spirit at its finest, and our resolve at its highest determination. Anyone can apply eight pounds of pressure to someone else’s chin, but it takes a champion to push forward and pressure an unrelenting opponent they just can’t seem to vanquish. Everyone gets knocked down from time to time, but champions get up. And that is the difference between success and failure; rather you have the heart and will to get up.

I was caught in the first round for a fight a couple of matches ago… and my buddy was telling me that when I got up he jump out of his seat, as if I had risen. Rising from defeat and refusing to fail is just as much as an accomplishment, and there is no loser in that kind of fight.

Greatness isn’t how many trophies’s, belts and titles you hold, it’s defined only by the size of your determination and perseverance.

TheKrastaGroupMuayThaiAddict

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Sitmonchai IV: a recap

Run

 

Review of my trip to Thailand, and Sitmonchai. Roni and I headed out from Bush intercontinental airport April 11, 2014. While waiting for our plane, we were informed that our plane had to make a medical emergency stop in New Orleans to drop of a passenger. So our first flight was delayed by an hour. After boarding and taking off, the pilot hauled ass to Doha Qatar and got us there in time to make our flight, which we thought we were going to miss. However, our connecting flight decided to leave 30 minutes early, and stranded us in Doha Qatar. Doha is a very conservative country, and my wife is not wearing a head gown and has short hair… two strikes against us, haha. Anyhow, we were about to catch another flight to Bangkok five hours later, at like 2am Saturday. We then flew 6 hours to Bangkok from Doha, and that flight ended up leaving the airport late and getting to Bangkok late, oh my god. Our poor driver waited on us for several hours, and was about to head home when we landed and were about to send a message to our friend Garry, that was at the camp, who notified them that we made it. Saturday, we made it in to Sitmonchai after a grand theft auto drive through the mean streets of Bangkok. We then got to meet everyone, paid for our stay, ate dinner and then headed off to bed. Saturday morning Garry met Roni and I outside; we sat and enjoyed a cup of horrible nestle instant coffee (Laughs) but the morning was so peaceful and calm, it didn’t matter. We enjoyed our slow start and kicked off our morning run. On our morning run, Garry and Roni did the smart thing by pacing themselves. I however am a bit of a meat head. I thought to myself “if P-nae and Jun can run third bridge… so can I” (Laughs). In all honest, I felt great running the third bridge. To give you an understanding of the scale, third bridge is 10k or 6.21371 miles. After my run, it was training time. I’m so used to hitting it hard; I forgot that I need to save some gas for the evening training too. So the structure is a longer run in the morning and a lighter pad session in the morning, more technical based. The evening was a shorter run, around 4 miles and a more intense and longer pad session, followed by bags, clinch or sparing. I think my favorite part is the attitude towards training, they were laid back and allowed everyone to training at his or her own pace. This is great, because it allows the fighters to listen to their body and take active rest days and rest days as needed. Now don’t get me wrong, these guys work there asses off. But they have the common sense to not run their fighters into the ground. One guy “Jimmie” was frustrated that Pee-A and the gym wouldn’t let him train or go for a run, two days out from his fight. This proved to be a smart move, and you can tell from the fighters performance’s that they look 110% and well rested when the get into that ring to work. I think what really impressed me, was that the gym treats everyone like family. You all train together, eat together… and often hang out together. Getting to work next to Pornsanae and several other fighters, sparing and clinching with the Lumpinee rising stars was amazing, guys like Lay and Jimme. Following our training, Chris, Garry, Roni and I had to have our post training roasted bananas from the Banana lady. These little treats, while not super sweet, were caramel’y goodness, and the perfect post workout snack before breakfast. After returning, at first we would go with Garry to amazon to get a decent cup of joe. But by the end of our training, we had traded our ceremonial cup of coffee for a siesta! 12-2pm naps were great, ditching out on the hottest part of the day, and getting rested up for that afternoon run and training. Some days, when my body said enough, I traded my run for a jump rope and shadow boxing session. And when the trainers noted I was blasted, they would work technical work with me. I definitely enjoyed the technical work the most. Anyone can show you a cartwheel kick or a wild flying move, but Kru Juab and Kru Kong Fa have the eyes of a master level coach… and would walk me through some of the finer nuances of the foot work and post-contact foot placement. Just like in boxing, you should always be able to throw or evade a punch, the same holds true for the science of eight. The finer details we worked really made my offence and defenses look a lot sharper. Never underestimate a highly trained eye.

 

 

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Anyhow, one midweek day we got the chance to see Jun “Thepnimit Sitmonchai” fight at Raja. That was a wonderful experience. Garry and I decided to place a bet on him. I mean what the hell… I’m standing back stage with one of our all-time favorite fighters, while he gets his hands wrapped. It’s a once in a life time experience. Jun came out strong landing the combos he wanted to land. In the second round he got rocked, and was stumbling back on his feet… I thought for sure he was going to get finished off, but somehow this really tough guy weathered the storm to the bell. Coming out to answer for round three was intense. I thought for sure he was a goner, until I saw him started to land hard shots and combos again. I realize we had a fight again, and just like that with in a split second, like a sniper Jun caught the guy with a right hook followed with a left leg kick that connected the right spot. His opponent started to limp, and once he saw that he poured the heat on and sent his opponent crashing to the mat. What a great fight that was. Following the excitement of the fight, we return to the camp for some rest.

 

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On one of the days, we got to see Lay (who is one of Lumpinee’s new rising stars) fight at a festival at the Wat about a 40 minute drive away, in the next village. Lay picked up an opponent that was a bit shorter and stocky. Lay being a tall lanky but strong fight quickly went to work utilizing his reach with kicks and long knee’s. Often his opponent attempted to rush and force an inside fight with him, but Ley was well prepared with his counter right hook and clinch game. Other than eating one or two hard crosses, Ley completely out classed his opponent and won all five rounds. It’s exciting to think about the future this guy has… I can’t wait to see this kid at Lion Fight or GloryWS one day. Continuing on I work a bit with a younger trainer, Ma. He was a good guy, and I enjoyed working my combos and reaction with him. Thankfully at home we’ve adopted a free flowing style of pad-work that models an actual fight. This allows the fighter to control the fight, instead of the fight controlling the fighter. So keeping Kong Fa and Juab’s corrections in mind, I got to free flow a lot more with hand and kick combos. He also took the time to show me some really slick stuff, which I’ll keep in my back pocket for later. Continuing on my training was pretty rough, but nothing worse than home. Getting the chance to split my training between the morning and afternoons was awesome, and I would kill to be able to do that here. Sadly, I have to cram all 5 hours of work in, in the afternoon. Oh well. Training at Sitmonchai, I actually gained a bit of weight. I made the mistake of challenging the Aussy (Matt Waldron) to a eating contest. Which was good, it allowed my body to adapt to the training schedule prior to cutting my caloric intake. Once I cut my intake a bit, the weight just melted off and I was pretty much ready for IFMA. All and all, if I could have redone it, I would have scheduled it a bit of time away from IFMA so that I could fight in Thailand. That’s ok though, Roni and I plan on going back soon. I’ll get my fight at Raja then.

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TheKrastaGroupMuayThaiAddict

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Sitmonchai day one

Welcome to the Fighters Life, and thanks for following us.

Sitmonchai Day one:

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Roni and myself made it in to Sitmonchai sunday, hung out with Garry and met some really awesome people that are staying here with us. Everyone is super nice and friendly, we’re definitely enjoying ourselves right now.

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Garry showed us around the village a bit; he showed us the Tesco/local small super market and the village banana treat stand. We were a bit tired after being up for 30 hours on our flight, so we started nodding off at 8pm, we called it a night and crashed a bit early. Which was sad, because my buddy Cody Moberly was fighting on the ThaiFight card that night, and we just couldn’t stay awake.

 

about to go for a run… but first, let me take a selfie BUUAHAHAHAH

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Monday morning, we were rested up and ready to work. We started our morning with a nice run; Roni and Garry did the smart thing by pacing themselves. I however, got a bit over zealous. I did the third bridge, which everyone says is 10k. personally, it felt like 8k. The temp here is really nice, it’s just like home in Houston. At 6am when we wake and have a cup of coffee, it’s a comfy 65-70 degrees. Which makes it really nice for sleeping, and for peaceful mornings. people have complained about being woken by a chorus of dogs and roosters, but I’ve been sleeping like a baby, and I think I was only woken once but the dog here at the camp, as he sounds freakishly like a human, with zombie undertones. (Laughs) but he’s a supper sweet dog.

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The heat and humidity is great during the day, as it’s feels just like Houston. It really helps to keep you from getting cold and stiff when you stop for a rest. Just stay hydrated. After our morning run, we wrapped up and got ready to hit. Just like home, you’re responsible to work at your own pace, big boy style. I worked with Kru Jaa and Roni has been working with Kru Pan “Pon”. My first session, was great. he was very technical, and I really enjoyed working with him. We worked on foot work and he help me with adding a bit more power to my knees, elbows and leg kicks. Got some really cool stuff for the students at home. I kind of felt a bit smothered with the boxing, but I just kept working with it and I finally started finding my range.

I started noticing he was wincing, once I started landing my power. Poor guy couldn’t weigh more then 135-145lbs, so I kind of felt bad.

After the morning training, Garry, Roni and I went by the banana stand and got some awesome treats. Oh my god, it was so freaking good. Also, a guy comes around on a scooter cart, and he makes these sweet scramble egg crapes wraps that are amazing. Anyhow, we did our afternoon run around 3:30pm,  it was hot, around 100-105, but nothing worse then home. I cut my run in half, because the evenings are the harder rounds and there’s sparing and clinching.

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After returning from our afternoon run, it was time to hit.

Kru Jaa held for me again, and we worked a lot of the same stuff. I love working at Sitmomchai, straight up meat and potatoes Muay thai, just really good sold fundamentals. “Good fundamentals are what win fights” – Kevin Ross

He spent some time working on some of my technical stuff dealing with leg kicks. They really liked my leg kick, but added a few more things to optimize the power level. It’s definitely going to take some time to implement some of the stuff he showed me. good thing I documented everything. I felt really bad, because I was just to big for him to work with. All and all, it was a great day of training. also I got to spar with a Lumpinee rising star Pech. really good kid and really strong, he’s another to watch out for in the next couple of years.

On another note, I got to meet and hang a bit with Moo before his big fight in turkey this weekend for Glory 15. I’m definitely excited for him, he’s earned this shot.

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There’s nothing flashy about this gym, it’s not a tourist spot, and that’s we I love this place. I highly recommend it if you’re serious about training in Thailand. This will be my home gym for every trip I make to Thailand hence forth. I’m just having a blast, and everyone is treating us like family.

Well, sorry to cut it short, but I’ve got to go and get ready for tuesday afternoon training. Afterwards we’re hitting up a night market/bazaar that opens once a week.

Thanks for reading.

You can follow my pictures posts on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/nethaneel.mongonia

 

TheKrastaGroupMuayThaiAddict

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Five fights, three KO’s, one weekend…

 

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Picture courtesy of BAUZEN.com

Article by DJ Miller

 

DJ Miller, 2014 WKA and the journey of a Muay Thai champion.

This year’s WKA tournament I was on a mission. Winning a belt was just a bonus to me. The mission was simple: BEAT EVERYBODY! I didn’t care who they were, where they trained at, how many fights they had. It was simple, defeat and destroy. Last year at the WKAs I was humiliated. I was put away in the first round in both divisions. I was horrifically under trained and not ready. It was the reason why I started to doubt my skill afterwards. Now I have a new gym, new coach and finally an actual team of skilled fighters. They all inspire me to represent the colors dominantly. At the tournament I was immediately recognized and greeted as the great fighter everybody thought I was. I knew deep down I had a bad feeling about the tournament because of what happened last year but at the same time I knew I was a completely fighter this time. I am bigger, faster, stronger and smarter. My new gym rebuilt me into a prototype machine and I was eager to see what I was made of. Upon entering the tournament I knew I would see my arch rival Adam Edgerton for a 3rd time. Let me just clarify that me and AJ agreed on a pact before the tournament that we agreed that this meet would not count as our much anticipated ‘rubber match’. The tournament was bigger than ever. I entered in Glory rules and full rules Muay Thai. I was time for me to send a message and remind the Muay Thai community just who in the hell I was. My 1st matchup was in Glory rules division. I unleashed my fury on my first opponent and KOd him in the 2nd round. The next up was full rules. My opponent gets massacred by my aggression and falls in the 3rd round by KO via knee. I look back at the brackets and saw that it was time for AJ next. The previous opponents were irrelevant. It was all about me and AJ now. We get in the ring and greet each other with a playful smirk from across the ring. The bell sounds and we get it on. AJ starts letting his hands fly like he does. I’m not backing down and return some fire myself. I’m hitting much harder and punching much faster. I instantly can tell he notices this. We tussle in the clinch a bit until I surprise him with high kick that comes down across his neck and instantly KOs him. He falls to the floor after 36 seconds. I am stunned. I don’t even celebrate. I go to the neutral corner and just take a knee while the officials check on him. I hear the crowd going crazy but I just wait patiently until AJ is able to get back on his feet. He congratulates me after he’s able to stand but one thing made me laugh. Adam is kind of out of his mind from the KO still but he says to me, “Dude, I don’t even know what the fuck you hit me with” (Laughs). We are done. I am passed the toughest guy in both of my divisions put together. But my mission is still not over, there are still asses to get got. My final fight in Glory rules division I go up against a guy that ends up teeping me in the throat in the 1st round. My esophagus is partially collapsed and I get a standing 8 count because I turn away choking. The ref counts me out because I didn’t recover myself in time. It is what it is. That fighter can take his gold and run but pray we don’t meet each other again because evidently I am the grim reaper of rematches. The last fight is up, full rules Muay Thai. My opponent is strong and game. I am so mentally and physically drained from being at that tournament since sunrise to sunset but I refused to give in. We fight a war. I prove myself once again and regain what was once mine. The North American Championship, now in the 154 class (as I was previously in the 142lbs weight class in 2012) I picked up 4 wins, 3 by way of knockout, and 1 loss for a total of 5 fights in one weekend. It was one hell of a ride.

 

TheKrastaGroupMuayThaiAddict

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